Posts tagged: clreawire

Another unhappy Broadstripe customer

In Reed’s blog post he explains some common complaints with Broadstripe in the Seattle area. In summary, poor speeds, network issues and questionable business practices.

What’s really cool about Reed’s experience is that is was very similar to mine. Though a difference is the cancellation procedure. When I initially canceled my service, they honored my request over the phone compared to Reed needing to fax in his request.

I compared Clear with Broadstripe for about a month. My experience was different with my comparison. I saw poor performance with high bandwidth applications on Clear. In contrast, Broadstripe could handle my needs a little better.

Reed, if you get a chance to see this post, please take at my others about Broadstripe and Clear. I think you will identify with my issues of choosing the lesser of two evils. Also, please check UPTUN. UPTUN is working to improve the situation in the Broadstripe served areas. Lastly, send a link to your post to the Broadstripe Twitter account, @earningstripes. You’ll maybe surprised at how receptive they are to your experience.

Some more general resources for Seattle folks:

Muni Networks http://www.muninetworks.org/
Seattle Gov’s Cable Office http://www.seattle.gov/cable/

Clearwire throttling consumer customers?

According to a thread over at the ClearWire forums, yes.

Engadget broke the ClearWire story today (Sept. 29th).

From my personal experience, yes Clear performs traffic shaping. I should have gathered data while I experimented with the throttling issue. The bandwidth issues I saw with Clear were throttling Bit Torrent traffic directly. This was easily mitigated by enabling forced encryption on the Torrents.

Clear users are seeing the throttling put into place when they exceed 7-10GB transferred in a month. However, I did not see throttling when I exceeded 10GBs. Total bandwidth usage cap seems to be a new issue.

Bandwidth throttling maybe a serious issue for Clear users. For example Comcast has a soft cap of 250GBs a month. This is more than enough for any user, even heavy bandwidth users. The Clear cap is too small for the modern household.

@Clear your marketing opt out page sucks, so I added you to the spam filter

Partner name? What is that supposed to mean? How about embedding the recipient email address in the opt-out links within your marketing emails? I get the impression you want to make opt-out difficult. It’s similar to your TOS. There’s no opt-out when you sign up for service. This is one of the reasons why a discontinued service.

Your opt-out page is why you are now on my “spammers” list.

Broadstripe in the Central District Rocks!

Broadband from Broadstripe has made great strides. In general, I’m able to accomplish more. I’ve inlcuded more in my backups because of the improved upload speeds. Also, everyone in the house can do what they like on the Internet. We can watch various movies, play games and browse the web all that the same time. These are things we could do only one at a time with Clearwire. Way to go Broadstripe!

First week in this figure is Clearwire, the second is Broadstripe.

Great Resouces – Seattle CTO and @communitynets

I received a Google alert tonight that linked to Community Broadband Networks. Muni Networks, as it’s also known as, is a great site put together by Christopher Mitchell. He’s cataloging the strides municipal networks are making to bring broadband to all. Awesome work Chris!

Muni Networks mentions the Seattle CTO, Bill Schrier. I’m pleased to see Seattle has a thoughtful person in the position.

From what I gather, municipal networks are started due to poor or no competition in the broadband market. This is troubling and encouraging at the same time. The downside is the State and Federal governments have not provided legal power to the cities and counties to regulate broadband. The good thing is, the city is creating competition.

What happens when you don’t have to try and you still get the money? You become lazy. That is what has happen to our broadband providers. The DSL and cable companies have only done enough to keep their monopolies. They have no reason to innovate and provide compelling products at the best price possible.

I hope Seattle deploys their own network. I know the under served in my neighborhood could use it. In the least, I hope Google deploys their test fiber project here.

Freepress breaks it down on broadband

While the FCC has good intentions, they still can’t grasp the true state of broadband in the US. Freepress does a great job of exploring FCC’s broadband tips. Give it a read and share your thoughts with your legislators.

Broadstripe, guys, read and take notes.

http://www.freepress.net/node/80219

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