Another unhappy Broadstripe customer

In Reed’s blog post he explains some common complaints with Broadstripe in the Seattle area. In summary, poor speeds, network issues and questionable business practices.

What’s really cool about Reed’s experience is that is was very similar to mine. Though a difference is the cancellation procedure. When I initially canceled my service, they honored my request over the phone compared to Reed needing to fax in his request.

I compared Clear with Broadstripe for about a month. My experience was different with my comparison. I saw poor performance with high bandwidth applications on Clear. In contrast, Broadstripe could handle my needs a little better.

Reed, if you get a chance to see this post, please take at my others about Broadstripe and Clear. I think you will identify with my issues of choosing the lesser of two evils. Also, please check UPTUN. UPTUN is working to improve the situation in the Broadstripe served areas. Lastly, send a link to your post to the Broadstripe Twitter account, @earningstripes. You’ll maybe surprised at how receptive they are to your experience.

Some more general resources for Seattle folks:

Muni Networks http://www.muninetworks.org/
Seattle Gov’s Cable Office http://www.seattle.gov/cable/

Clearwire throttling consumer customers?

According to a thread over at the ClearWire forums, yes.

Engadget broke the ClearWire story today (Sept. 29th).

From my personal experience, yes Clear performs traffic shaping. I should have gathered data while I experimented with the throttling issue. The bandwidth issues I saw with Clear were throttling Bit Torrent traffic directly. This was easily mitigated by enabling forced encryption on the Torrents.

Clear users are seeing the throttling put into place when they exceed 7-10GB transferred in a month. However, I did not see throttling when I exceeded 10GBs. Total bandwidth usage cap seems to be a new issue.

Bandwidth throttling maybe a serious issue for Clear users. For example Comcast has a soft cap of 250GBs a month. This is more than enough for any user, even heavy bandwidth users. The Clear cap is too small for the modern household.

@Clear your marketing opt out page sucks, so I added you to the spam filter

Partner name? What is that supposed to mean? How about embedding the recipient email address in the opt-out links within your marketing emails? I get the impression you want to make opt-out difficult. It’s similar to your TOS. There’s no opt-out when you sign up for service. This is one of the reasons why a discontinued service.

Your opt-out page is why you are now on my “spammers” list.

Clearwire to retain “unlimited” data plans

According to gizmodo clearwire is to keep their “unlimited” data pricing structure.

However, clearwire is not unlimited but rather “unlimited”. If you look closely at their TOS it states they can throttle or cut your service for “excessive” use. What is considered excessive? Clearwire won’t tell. Thus I use “unlimited” when referring to their data plans.

http://gizmodo.com/5555898/clearwire-were-going-to-keep-unlimited-data-plans-alive